Category Archives: Education

Cambodia Medical Elective program upgraded..

The PPSC Rose Medical Elective Program is newly established although Rose has had experience in providing a medical elective program in the past. Our star Surgeon, Dr Nous Sarom has moved to become the Head of Surgery at the Preah Mettokelea Surgical Centre (PPSC) at the Military Hospital in Phnom Penh. Dr Sarom has had a long history with Rose and we have adapted our program to follow this wonderful surgeon and teacher. The Program is now being administered by Ms Sophak Chim who has excellent organisational skills and fantastic written English. She is managing our complicated schedule and ensuring that students receive communication from Cambodia upon receiving their email enquiries. Obviously being a new program there will be teething problems but we hope that the program will evolve to be a leading elective program in Cambodia, especially with the assistance of great feedback from the students!  … read more…

Rose Madagascar 2012 marked by amazing academic success !

Amazing success for Mahatsara Students in 2012. Amongst
top in region !

 

Who we are
Rose Madagascar is a small, volunteer-run group that is
committed to improving access to education in rural Madagascar. While our Canadian
Board is based in Western Canada, the heart and soul of our work lies in the
hands of our Malagasy partners who work tirelessly to improve the quality of
life in rural Madagascar.
Mahatsara
Rural Education Initiative
Our main project, the
Mahatsara Rural Education Initiative, is located in Tsarahonenana, Madagascar.
The vision for Mahatsara came from a group of community members who saw a need
for education development in their village.
In English, Mahatsara
literally means ‘getting better’, or ‘improving’ and that is exactly what the
project aims to do. Having recognized a deficiency in early childhood
education, environmental awareness, nutrition, and literacy, Rose Madagascar
teamed up with Mahatsara to start a school in their village. The school is the
first project of many in a 10 year plan that will concentrate on improving the
quality of life in rural Madagascar.
Our Objectives
  • To reach out to individuals and
    communities facing adversity.
  • To empower individuals and
    communities to improve their quality of life from within.
  • To provide children and adults
    with access to academic and vocational training to improve the standard of
    living.
  • To encourage sustainable and
    holistic development through programs that consider the environment,
    health, education, and social well-being of communities as fundamental
    principles guiding development.
Mahatsara Projects &
Achievements:
  • Quality Education – In addition to providing access to education to
    children who would not otherwise have the opportunity to attend school,
    Mahatsara is committed to ensuring that each child receives a quality
    education. 
News from the 2011-2012 school year – Mahatsara students have had an
amazing year of success.  We are very
proud to report that our grade 5 students were ranked amongst the top in the
region this year. The top grade on the National Examination in the Alarobia
region went to one of our students (with six other Mahatsara students scoring
in the top 10). 
In addition, all 27 Mahatsara grade 9 students passed the
difficult National Exam to receive their diplomas (we are still awaiting the
regional results to see where the students rank).
  • Community Garden Project – The school has a series of community garden plots
    that are cultivated by parents, students, and other community members. A
    portion of the harvest from each garden plot is contributed to the
    Mahatsara nutrition program.
  • Nutrition Program – The nutrition program provides lunch to
    students in an effort to ensure that each child receives at least one
    healthy meal per day. Parents volunteer at the program on a daily basis and
    students take turns bringing firewood for cooking from home each day.
  • The Mahatsara Parent’s Association – The Mahatsara Parent’s
    Association is the driving force behind the project and the school. While
    the parents of Mahatsara do not always have the ability to contribute
    financially to their children’s education, they contribute in many other
    resourceful and much needed ways.
  • Community Library – The school has a library with a small
    collection of books and educational resources. Books are very expensive in
    Madagascar
    so virtually all of the books have been donated by international
    volunteers.
  • Sports Programs – The School is engaged in a variety of sports
    teams and programs. In 2011, the Mahatsara basketball team made it to the
    regional finals.
  • Health Education – Throughout the years Mahatsara has organized
    community health education sessions at the request of community members.
    Some of the topics that have been covered include: sex education,
    nutrition training, and training on the hazards of cooking on a fire
    indoors.
  • The Mahatsara Store – The Mahatsara store sells school supplies and
    other small items to community members who can afford them. All proceeds
    are put back into the project.
  • Field Trips – The school has taken students on several field trips
    in the surrounding area. Among the most significant field trips has been a
    trip to the capital of Madagascar,
    Antananarivo
    through which older students at the school had the opportunity to see the
    capital and to tour the University. For most students, this was their
    first trip to Antananarivo

To school by JET (the Rose JET Fund )

While watching his dad struggling with a complex grant application for  child education,  his son asked why it was so difficult. His father told him that it was so difficult finding the ‘novel approaches’ the donors were looking for, explaining that so  many grants now wanted to be new-thinking and different’ .  His don looked confused   “Whats that got to do with going to school”  he said….

Bingo !  KISSS !  ‘Keep it Simple, just Send kids to School !’

The media  nowadays try to get the stories which are different, unusual, sensational.  Many grant panels are pulled by this process. Understandably they want the publicity (helps they themselves get needed donations).   Organizations making light bulbs out of Coke bottles, computers made of of tin-cans etc attract attention.

While these fascinating projects have their place, the fact is, while of little media ‘wow’ ,   in the developing world, kids want, but huge numbers cant afford, to go to school.    More often than not the schools are there, the kids simply cant access them for want of the pitifully small amount of money, perhaps $50 per year which is needed to support the school.

In many cases the actual school building exists (organizations sometimes build, run the school for a while then move on) and there is are teachers available who will work for the barest minimum.

The Jet-Fund is aimed at helping creating a jet-stream of kids to be able to fulfill their dreams of education to help them fly into successful and happy futures.  At the moment the fund works very closely with the K2K program(s) in Sri Lanka, though it is being expanded into other parts of Asia and into Africa too.

The fund is administered by an advisory panel of school-children (currently UK) overseen by one or more members of the Rose Charities International Council.  No administration costs are taken at the donor country end, though a small percentage (up to 10% absolute maximum) is permitted at the recipient end to ensure proper screening and structuring (as can be imagined demand is colossal and far far outweighs the funding available)

If you’d like to become an ‘Education Jetsetter’  please contact  jetset@rosecharities.org  , donation page , or DONATE DIRECTLY (via UK site) Note: enter ‘for JET Fund in ‘notes to the Organization’ at the end of the process

Any donation welcomed (however small); or select a specific level,

Jetsetter – Economy:   $50 per year (1 kids to school)

Jetsetter – Business:     $100 per year (2 kids to school)

Jetsetter – First Class   $300 per year (6 kids to school)

Jetsetter – Exec suite   $500 per year  (10 kids to school)

Jetsetter – Private jet   $1000 per year (20 kids to school)  ( Private  ROSE-Jet registration allocated.. ie. RJET2 <  2, or more,’1′ is already taken ..yippee!> )

A Tale of Two Women (and thousands of lives saved… !)

This is the story of two women.  One woman uses a piece of clean string and a clean razor blade.   With  it she saves,  scores, hundreds, probably thousands of lives. The people she saves are mothers and their babies. The mothers have given birth where there is no medical assistance.  Lack of hygiene, lack of knowledge, even some traditional practices in severing the umbilical cord provide the fertile conditions for infection. Sometimes mud or even cow dung are used to apply to the raw ends of the cord.  The clean string is used simply to tie the cord and the sterile blade to cut it. .

Now the woman makes up cheap kits. They simply contain instructions, soap, sterile string and blade and some.  All it takes to save two lives is a clean pad, soap, razor blade, a length of string and a set of illustrated instructions.  Each kit will save 2 lives.  The kits are quietly  distributed to where they are needed thoughout the world.

The other woman who follows the same path. She travels to rural Central America with a small team to carry the same simple message and taking also, birthing kits with her.   Year after year she returns and year after year she finds more women who, having seen the results of what she has been teaching others, wish to learn. Her course lasts 4 days. The woman  educates child birth attendants to wash their hands. Thousands of women die every year because of not doing this. She educates them in the simple things that will save.

Both women know that 820,000 women die because of  childbirth every year; 99% of them are in developing countries.  They know that, worldwide, a woman dies in childbirth every 40 seconds.  They know that three quarters of the 4 million babies who die every year could be saved by simple interventions. They know that so many women simply have no access to safe medical facilities (in Bangladesh for example only 9% of births take place in clinics or hospitals)   They know the grief and suffering of so many families through these events.

So quietly, simply, they have rolled up sleeves and helped.  No full spread media campaigns, no double-space TV ads, no fleets of white SUV’s, no first-class  ‘celebrity spokesperson’ visits. They just do it themselves, unsung heroes, quietly saving lives…

1)   http://wordbirthaid.org
2)   http://safemotherhoodproject.org

Sri Lanka Women’s Events

Sports Day, Debates and Bus Rides

It’s been a busy couple of weeks for us at the Rose Charities Sri Lanka office. The Women’s Sports Meet was a great success as women’s groups from Kalmunai, Pandarippu, Natpaddiumunai and Karaitivu came to participate in a fun day of team building games, skill competitions and social activities. Prizes were handed out to winners while everyone enjoyed a fun-spirited afternoon at the Rose Sri Lanka Head Office.

In the traditional English class, staff are learning how to construct an argument, an important skill in all languages. To display what they have learned, we conducted a class debate between women staff and men staff. The topic was “Women need to have a profession, participate in the work force and the duties at home should be shared between husband and wife.” The girls’ team supported the statement while men were against. It turned out to be a heated debate, demonstrating strong debating skills on both sides. The men of the office stated safety is an issue for young girls and women, especially after dark, limiting a woman’s working hours and freedom to leave the house. On the other hand, the women argued that the more women become professionals the more likely women’s safety will become a priority in society. It was clear that this debate is an important issue among young people in Sri Lanka. Many of the women staff members voiced strong opinions on this issue, attitudes that were certainly formed well before the debate assignment.

Sonia and I spent the weekend at Arugam Bay surfing, swimming and enjoying the beautiful Sri Lankan beach. On our way home, we opted to take the public transit to Kalmunai. About a half hour outside of Kalmunai, a woman boarded the bus with bags of flour and many supplies. She had gone to a neighboring town to purchase ingredients and supplies. As she turned around and saw Sonia and I on the bus her face lit up as she recognized us from the Rose’s Women’s Meet last week. She then exclaimed to the entire overcrowded bus that we were from Canada working in Kalmunai for Rose Charities, an organization that had lent her money to start her small business. As soon as she said the word “Rose” we could see that many people recognized the name and looked at us with gratitude and excitement.

As a token of her appreciation she handed us two small bags of kurakan flour, a type of flour used to make string hoppers and puttu (my favorite Sri Lankan meal). She then quickly jumped off of the moving bus with her luggage and gracefully placed the heavy bags of flour on the crest of her head. As the bus pulled away we watched her balance the bags, weaving in and out of street traffic and into a side street.

The last week has demonstrated the strength, generosity and intelligence of the Sri Lankan people, especially the women. Whether at the Women’s Sport Meet, in the office among the staff or on the bus, we can’t help but appreciate the independent spirit of all of the women we meet.