Category Archives: Community Support

Menstrual Care Kits for Uganda

Many girls across the world are unable to attend school when they have their periods as they have no access to affordable menstrual care. Days for Girls is a US non-profit that has developed reusable kits that solve this problem. Their aim is to develop sustainable solutions that remove limitations for women and girls. Thanks to a partnership between Rose Charities and Disaster Aid Canada( a distributor for Days for Girls) 50  menstruation kits were sent from Vancouver to two of Rose’s projects in Uganda – Stand Tall School and Smiles Scholarship program. The kits had quite the journey! Made by volunteers on Vancouver Island, they were brought to Vancouver on the ferry, then transported in a hockey bag to Kampala where they were delivered to the girls.Along with some education about menstrual hygiene these kits will enable the young women to attend school without interruption each month. This is such a basic need for young women – access to products that allow them to continue with their lives whatever time of the month.

Maggie Francis (Chair Rose Charities Canada)

Rose NZ supporting student education in Nepal

Rose Charities NZ has worked with Ms Sarala Adhikari (Rose in Nepal) to cooperate with  the Shikharapur Community School (Principal Mr Binod Mahat, Campus Chief , Mr Niroj Shrestha)  in the beautiful and holy Pharping area in the Kathmandu Valley Nepal.  http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Pharping

 

Rose Charities NZ provided the funds for an entire and much needed new rood for the school in return for 7 students to be sponsored to grade 10 and 2 to even higher level.

It is anticipated that this program will meet with every success for the girls and will lead on to further cooperative efforts to increase support (especially female) education both in Nepal and worldwide.

Shikharapur Community School has close links with Tribhuvan University Kathmandu.

 

 

Safe Motherhood Guatemala, continued success and expansion in 2017

2017 marked the 15th year of the Safe Motherhood Project in Guatemala.  To recap, the Safe Motherhood Project is an educational project to train traditional Mayan Midwifes (Comadronas) in safe birthing techniques and emergency skills in caring for women who have their babies at home.  Each course is 5 days long.  We now have a competent team of 3 Guatemalan midwives who do the bulk of the teaching.  We strive to conduct 3 to 4 courses per year each course attended by 30 Comadronas and/or Paramedics.  The Canadian members of the project comprise 2 midwives, 1 family physician, and 1 maternity nurse. We Canadians visit at our own expense

once a year in February to make sure the project is on track or to provide practice updates. To date we have taught over 1000 Comadronas in various communities in many parts of the country.

Since our last report, the team has made 2 visits to Chisec, in the department of Alta Verapaz and has been able to teach 3 courses and a total of 100 comadronas in this municipality. Educational space and meals were generously provided by Karen and Rocky of Compelling Love Ministries, a couple from Kamloops who have acquired a small acreage in Chisec to provide community health education programs and to create a children’s nutritional center.  As I write this report, our Guatemalan team will be teaching for 2 weeks, roughly 60 students, in Chichicastenango, a large market community in the highlands of the department of Quiche.

Efforts have been made to connect with local Guatemalan NGOs to collaborate materially and financially on this project. Unfortunately, while we receive lots of approval and verbal support, material support at a local level has not been forthcoming.  I believe the reality for this project in Guatemala, as with much of the health and education infrastructure in the country, is a dependence on foreign donations for sustainability.  A positive development in this country strapped for health dollars is that the Comadronas have been recognized since 2014 as an essential part of the health care system.  The government has made efforts to credential Comadronas who receive formal training.  We have received official recognition of our course from several levels of government.

This coming February 2018, the Canadian team members will return to Guatemala for 2 weeks of courses. The community is to be determined.  However, the popularity of our course has increased by “word of mouth” and there are several communities requesting our presence.  The need is still there for this educational program.  We are proud that we have been able to continue this project for 15 years and look forward the project continuing for many more years to come.

Sistema Aotearoa, NZ’s remarkable youth orchestra: a Rose NZ support target..

sistemanz3“If you had all been with Pip D and me this afternoon in South Auckland you would be at home tonight with a rosy glow in your hearts — or wherever you keep your rosy glows !…..

Pip and I attended, first, a very low key informal but heartfelt “cuppa” time before a BIG concert where we, and other supporters of Sistema were thanked over and over. A Samoan family spoke, to add impact— and that they surely did that, about what it meant to them to be a Sistema family. The young daughter student, maybe 12 or 13, read a speech describing how her music had lifted her to explore heights she thought impossible. (She is now a scholarship student at St Cuthberts, but that’s another story.). Her mother, Lindah, spoke really eloquently about what it mean for her and her husband to have their eldest three children learning violin, clarinet and trombone, and their fourth child, a cute little boy who sat through the whole long afternoon without a murmur, is rearing to join up. She particularly emphasised what it meant to live in Otara, aware of so many negative attitudes towards her community and sistemanz1her people, to have something as positive as Sistema to turn attitudes on their head.
The Dad, who apologized for his incoherence having come straight from work, was really the most eloquent of all:  He was speechless and tearful in his gratitude…….
THEN we went in to the huge arena-type stadium/hall and the music began! Nearly 400 children performed in different “orchestras” all through the afternoon. Other children sat on the floor listening with amazingly full-on attention. The music ranged from the beginners whose concentration, discipline  and application was remarkable (aged 6 or 7) to the two orchestras numbering around 100 students who so vividly demonstrated the great skills they had acquired. Really it took heart-warming to a new level and Pip and I both loved every minute. We sat behind two principals of the local schools and they are clearly rapt with the project and the difference it makes to their students. Maths, English and “leadership” qualities have all taken many notches UP for the kids involved. It just makes you WISH every child had the same chances. One young boy announcer talked about the thrill of looking at music not understanding a thing about it, then being able to read it, then PLAY it! He made it sound like one of the thrills of his life.
sistema-aotearoa-flute-kidsThe Wind Band came near the end of the programme and they were super cool. Flutes, I think five, were in evidence, plus clarinets, five, trombones, trumpets.  A real thrill and I know every Rose Trustee would have been absolutely delighted.
So I pass on the most sincere thanks from all the Sistema trustees, the teachers, the students…….Well done Roses for our  role in it all

We can happily be sure it will be a great project for continued support. In fact we were told Creative NZ is cutting back on their funding so people like us are even more important in the future. … Trish Gribben (Rose Charities NZ Trustee)

 

Rose Canada April 2017 ‘Mini-Forum’ : ‘Malaria in Education / Child and Human Rights’, great success

Consultants,  Linda Robers (Charit Rose 2014) and Professor Andrew Macnab (Chari. Rose 2012) gave the first Rose Charities Canada ‘TED-style’ presentations of the new mini-forum format to great acclaim.

Andrew spoke on the success of his amazing new rapid malaria diagnosis and on-site treatment program currently implemented with wonderful  result in rural Ugandan schools.  The program is currently being assessed by the Thai Government for implementation in rural regions of their country. Andrew had just returned from consultations at Mahidol and other Thai centers with view to such development

Linda Roberts

Linda, who is a council member of the Rose Charities International Council as well as one of Rose Charities Canada’s leading consultants, delivered an important presentation on child and human rights and ensuring their proper implementation across all Rose Charities direct and linked programs.   The superb presentation lead then to considerable audience discussion .

The new ‘mini-forum’ format had been instituted and planned by the Rose Charities Administration Committee, and now having shown to be enormously successful will be repeated.  On this occasion the forum was held in the fireside room of the United Church Centre for Peace hall  on  16th and Burrard, Vancouver, an excellent venue.

Throwing malaria out of Ugandan schools: the malaria hero’s !

andres-malaria1Malaria is being tackled in rural Ugandan schools with Dr Anrew Macnab’s remarkable early rapid diagnosis and treatment program delivered by trained school ‘malaria hero’s’, school staff especially trained.  Implemented by Rose Charities Canada’s  Dr Andrew and HEDA Uganda, the program is giving hugely successful, recorded results, cutting the absenteeism through sickness much hated by student and teacher alike.   Please click here to see the most recent paper on the marvellous results.

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Project Toolkit Samoa: Rose Charities NZ gets going .. !

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Caption: Rose Charities NZ chairperson, Trish Gribben examines a custom-designed “toolbox” which will carry delicate ENT instruments between Auckland and Apia, Samoa.

Project Toolkit” — ENT for Samoa

It’s for the little ones.” — Dr P.J. Faumui

Rose Charities NZ has an exciting new project – to take Ear, Nose and Throat surgery to Samoa, to help an estimated 25,000 children who need treatment.

“Project Toolkit” is the dream of a Samoan ENT surgeon who lives in Whanganui, Dr P.J. Faumui. There is no permanent ENT surgeon in Samoa and every time “PJ” (as he is affectionately known) visits his family in Samoa he conducts an ENT clinic at Apia Hospital. PJ sees about 40 or 50 patients a day but, without good medical instruments, is able to give them only very simple low-risk treatment.

So Rose Charities NZ has commited to Project Toolkit, a $45,000 set of top quality ENT instruments and the custom-designed trays which will make it possible to transport them between New Zealand and Samoa for visiting volunteer surgeons to conduct ENT clinics there. The trays, with silicone inserts to keep the instruments safe and secure, are designed to allow for sterilisation and for customs inspections.

PJ himself will head the team of volunteers, some of whom work at Auckland’s Starship Children’s Hospital.

Sheffmed, an Auckland-based medical equipment company is collaborating with the project. It has offered discounted prices and a vital role in maintaining and keeping the Toolkit safe when it is back from the tropical conditions of Samoa. Sheffmed will also liaise with volunteer doctors who are heading to Samoa.

Why has Rose Charities NZ, which has an international reputation for it support of eye clinics in Cambodia and Nepal, decided to focus on ENT surgery?

“Children who have untreated ear, nose and throat problems in early childhood, like “glue ear”, can be scarred for life,” says Rose chairperson Trish Gribben. “If they can’t hear well, they don’t do well at school, they become disruptive, they have behaviour problems. It’s not far-fetched to say untreated ENT problems can be a building block for an anti-social life.

“The children in Samoa are our neighbours. They deserve something better. The Kiwi Rose Trustees are really excited about PJ’s Project Toolkit. It fits Rose philosophy perfectly: Help a local person to do a grassroots project when a little effort can have a BIG impact,” says Trish.

“When I signed up with Sheffmed I asked PJ if he was thrilled,” said Trish. “His reply: “Well, it is for the little ones.”

“Rose NZ is hooked. Now we have to find the money. It is a big project for us as we are all volunteers. But we are delighted to be working with some Rotary clubs throughout New Zealand. And, through them, with the Harold Thomas Trust which is the legacy of the first New Zealander to be president of Rotary International, set up to provide health care for children in the Pacific. Harold Thomas just happens to have been my uncle — it is all a perfect fit, says Trish.

RCSL: ‘Every great achievement was once considered impossible’

Vigneswara Tamil Vidyalayam is located in Hopton, a “tea plantation” village in Lunugala town in the middle of a mountain range (about 150 km from Colombo and elevated about 750 m above the sea level).
This school was started during the British colonization period in 1938 with only one “shack” building. The persistent effort of the villagers made it possible to upgrade this school to a Secondary School (grade 1 to Grade 11) with 480 students and 30 teachers. Guided by the current principal Mr. S. Thiyagasundaram, this School became a “model School” with awards and achievements.
The Community around this school is very poor with the parents are mostly plantation labours. The main agricultural product of this community is tea. There are many beautiful tea estates in Lunugala. For generations, the majority of the villagers are labours in the tea estate. Additionally people cultivate pepper, cinnamon and cacao and do home based small business.
Presently there is awareness for education in this area. The villagers need help and support to find the resource for education. This was identified by Rose Charities Srilanka two years ago. For RCSL, it has been a new experience to work in the Hill Country.
For the last two years RCSL provides educational support. Since 2014 Rose Lanka Microcredit has also started a village group in Hopton, Lunugala with the support of AMDA. So far there are 52 active members from this village group.
This school became the main recipient of various types of support from Rose Charities Srilanka and Rose Lanka Microcredit pvt ltd. For the last two years education materials, books and other supports were given to this school
This year the volley ball team of Vigneswara Tamil Vidyalayam (under 15 age group) came third place in all island level. This is a milestone in the history of this school. Rose Charities Srilanka and Rose Lanka Microcredit gave volley ball, nets and shoes to those kids. Few of the boys who were achieved this were from the microcredit families of Rose Charities.
The story did not end here. Like the previous years, 8 Primary students have passed in the Grade 5 Scholarship Exams held this year. They were felicitated by Rose Charities Srilanka and Rose Lanka Microcredit. Medals were awarded to these kids.
The school community is grateful for what has been done and welcome the efforts of Rose Charities Srilanka and Rose Lanka Microcredit for future support.

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School support in remote N.E. Thailand

hrh-kids3The Baan Mae Ramoeng School is close to the Myanmar border and helps around 1000 children from remove areas of considerable impoverishment. Population consists of mainly subsistence farming and there are many families displaced by conflict among the local population, the majority of which are ethnically Karen people.

Rose’s close Vancouver/Richmond partner organization CIEAF (Canadian International Education Assistance Fund) set out to assist this school having identified its needs through the Royal Thailand Consulate in Vancouver, which in turn was promoting its needs from one its main support group as one of the schools (of many) supported by Thailands Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn in her considerable and noteworthy spectrum of charitable assistance.

hrh-kids1The Baan Mae Ramoeng School is close to the Myanmar border and helps around 1000 children from remove areas of considerable impoverishment. Population consists of mainly subsistence farming and there are many families displaced by conflict among the local population, the majority of which are ethnically Karen people.

HRH. Princess Sirindhorn identified that many of the children at the Baan Mae Ramoeng School had to walk huge

Her Royal Highness Princess Sirindhorn makes a visit
Her Royal Highness Princess Sirindhorn makes a visit

distances, as much as 40km each way to attend class. Dormatary facilities were badly needed. In addition need for a vocational training scheem was also noted in order to try to boost income generation for families in this very poor area.

CIEAF, Thai Consulate and Rose Charities aim to work together for fund-raising and implementation of the school upgrade program and this will start with a fundraiser at the Thai Consulate in Vancouver on September 19th.

hrh-kids4Donations are, greatly welcomed, tax-receiptable (Canada) and may be made on line here (scroll down the list of causes to Thailand after you hit the donate button)

 

 

‘Let there be Hope’ : CIEAF-Rose-AMDA Dinner for Nepal Rehabilitation.

ciaf-poster copy‘Dinner for Hope for Nepal’   CIEAF-Rose Charities Canada – AMDA Canada.  Generously hosted by the Continental Seafood Restaurant Richmond, Vancouver ..  Wed 24th June 2015  6.30 pm.     Donations and half of ticket cost  are tax receiptable (Canada).   Tickets from Continental Restaurant.   604-278-6331   Donations (not ticket sales) on line here